• An article by Dr Lauren Dempster on ‘quiet’ transitional justice for ‘the disappeared.’

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  • Routledge

  • Social and Legal Studies

    The provision of academic outlets for critical scholarship on the intersection between law and societies in transition is a political, moral and intellectual imperative. Social and Legal Studies has provided an obvious home for precisely such engagement. Therefore, the rationale for putting this special issue together was to showcase the strength and diversity of transitional justice related scholarship published in the journal, to underscore the relevance of the field to a more generalist audience of socio-legal scholars, and to offer some tentative pointers for future directions for research.

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  • International Journal of Transitional Justice

    This article on the ‘respectabilisation’ of transitional justice by Prof Kieran McEvoy can be found in the International Journal of Transitional Justice by following the link.

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  • International Journal of Transitional Justice

    Article: ‘Working with Others: Reflections on Fieldwork in Postconflict Societies’ by Cheryl Lawther, Rachel Killean and Lauren Dempster and published in International Journal of Transitional Justice.

    Abstract

    In this Note from the Field we reflect on the challenges of doing sensitive fieldwork in postconflict and transitional societies. Our reflections are informed by sustained fieldwork with victims and perpetrators of violent conflict in a range of transitional jurisdictions. While undertaking this work, we have been acutely aware of the challenges raised by our own position in the field and by the power dynamics at play when working with partner organizations and speaking with vulnerable communities. Focusing on the themes of preparation, partners and positionality, this Note highlights the benefits and potential pitfalls of this style of qualitative work and seeks to encourage a more reflexive approach to working with victims and survivors of gross human rights violations.

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  • Fordham International Law Journal

    This article discusses the implications of Brexit on the peace process in Northern Ireland.

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  • The Oxford Handbook Of Criminology
    Oxford University Press

    This chapter, published in The Oxford Handbook of Criminology (6th edition, 2017, eds. Alison Liebling, Shadd Maruna, and Lesley McAra), considers the utility of several criminological themes to transitional justice and draws on ideas emerging from a number of Professor McEvoy’s research projects, including Apologies, Abuses, and Dealing with the Past.

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